Can Machine Learning Save Us from Us?

Among the top headlines in Google News’s Technology section today was criminal hackers use of AI (Artificial Intelligence) and its subset, ML (Machine Learning)1. Opening the article, I found a synopsis of a Tech Republic report, “Cybersecurity: Let’s Get Tactical,” in which the authors give ten ways cybercriminals are attacking with AI2 including

  • phishing attacks, in which, upon gaining credentialed access, automatic scripts can wreak havoc, including draining bank accounts
  • credential stuffing and brute force attacks, in which AI systems try passwords — and password possibilities — on many websites
  • bulletproof hosting services that use automation to hide the tracks of malicious websites, so they can’t be stopped by law-enforcement, or often flagged by network scanning tools

The fact is, it’s an arms race. Both malware and criminal sites would be pretty quickly and easily identified on a network by the nature of their activity. So the criminals try to disguise their malware in benign code and their sites in bulletproof hosting schemes. The way they keep the ruse going is through machine learning adapting to changing circumstances.

Meet Frank Walek

Frank Walek has been recently hired as an IT Support Technician to operate Bryley Systems’ dispatch center.

Mr. Walek graduated from the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester and has been working in customer service and support for the past ten years. He has worked for non-profit organizations and special education programs, developing a reputation for excellent customer service and always going above and beyond to help others. In 2019, Frank completed a Google certificate program for IT support professionals and is merging his passion of helping others with technical services at Bryley Systems.

 

 

Cybersecurity Risk Assessment Becoming a Must for Investors

In July the World Economic Forum (WEF) delivered a paper1 that argued for putting the muscle of investment into shifting the cybersecurity landscape. WEF/Marsh & McLennan reports2 that among weapons of mass destruction and natural disasters, cyberattacks are seventh in likelihood and eighth in impact as the greatest threats to global prosperity.

So Long, Old Friend

January 14, 2020. The day Win7 died. Really it’s the day Microsoft stopped issuing free security updates and support for the nearly 11-year-old OS. No more patches. No more tech support for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008/2008 R2.

And gathered among us are some who are denying the inevitable: migrating to Windows 10. A world without patches is no place to secure your business’s data. Windows desktop OS vulnerabilities have almost doubled the past six years. 1 And one-in-three breaches 2 caused globally is due to an unpatched vulnerability. A breach could mean curtains for your business: the average cost of a data breach in 2018 was $3.86 million (each lost or stolen record averaged out to $148). Consider the risks in remaining without security updates.

Meet Lucas Belo

Lucas Belo has been recently hired as a Technician at Bryley Systems. His key contributions at Bryley include configuration of laptops/desktops to client specifications as well as deployments at client sites.

“I’ve been interested in all things computers since I was a kid” said Lucas. “I am always ready to learn new and more efficient ways to get something done.” As a graduate of Joseph Keefe Technical High School in Framingham, Mr. Belo has hands-on IT training and a genuine enthusiasm for problem solving along with exceptional customer service skills. He is a very sociable person who works well with others and we are pleased that Lucas has joined the Bryley technical team.

UPS Store Breach Included Rhode Island Customers

UPS Store headquarters issued a letter1 to possible “victims of a phishing incident” that included Rhode Island UPS Store customers. Based on the letter, which hides the particulars, it looks like a criminal convinced an employee or employees in the UPS Store system to provide store email credentials. Once these credentials were had, customers emailing the store were also (or maybe only) sending their documents to the criminal. And possibly any data that had been kept in the email accounts were accessed.

Talking with Office 365 and G-Suite Back-Up Expert, Alex Courson

Bryley backs-up your office suite data in the cloud for Office 365, Google’s G-Suite and SalesForce in partnership with Kaseya Powered Services. To better understand what happens in the cloud I spoke with Alex Courson, an authority on Kaseya’s Office 365, G-Suite and SalesForce back-up products.

Don’t Microsoft and Google Back-Up Everything Already?

Q: Do cloud-based office suites assume liability for your data? Is that something that has changed, or do you foresee changing over the years?

Bryley: Your Enterprise-Grade Networking System

“We are all cyborgs,” says Amber Case1, as we allow technology to expand our mental capacities. How much more is this true of our businesses? Having continuous access to information allows a business to thrive. Break that access and employee’s productivity is broken, too. Unbroken access to data is what Bryley delivers to its clients.

Kristin Pryor has joined Bryley Systems as the Director of Services/Delivery

Kristin Pryor has joined Bryley Systems as the Director of Services/Delivery.

Pryor’s impressive IT background spans over 25 years in the industry as an IT Manager, Technical Project Manager and Infrastructure Manager. She is a Microsoft Certified Trainer; Engineer; Administrator; Technician; Professional and ITIL Foundations v3 certified.

“I love being on the cutting edge of new technologies,” said Pryor, “constantly learning and developing as well as being able to take these tested and proven pieces of technologies and have clients and employees trained to utilize them to improve their work environment and daily processes.”

Let it Snow, Let it Snow, Let it Snow

I’m feeling pretty good about making the switch away from shoveling and snow-blowing the driveway at my house to hiring a plowing service. Today the truck arrived early and in minutes cleared the snow, so that a little while ago I was able to just back out onto my road.

It’s a nice place to live, but the road is narrow and winds around a stream at a good grade. The town has put up steel guard rails at spots, and cars make use of them. Two Winters back…