If you give a moose a mouse…It’s going to want a keyboard! (Or, moose on the loose.)

Today (Thursday, 5/14/2020) at 9am this little guy was visiting Clinton’s Central Park which borders our office. (That’s the Clinton, Massachusetts Town Hall in the background.) Apparently, he was seeking IT support, but was unable to press our video-doorbell. (Cathy Livingstone is demonstrating the appropriate video-doorbell technique, which can be challenging if you have a hoof.)

Many thanks to Sue Templeton, Chief of Staff for Representative Harold Naughton, for sharing the moose picture.

         

Hat Day at Bryley…

It’s Friday, so something special is going on at the office. Kristin, Director of Services/Delivery, suggested “Fun Friday — Hat Day!”, which led to these pictures. Remember; no matter what the occasion, we are here for you!

If This Is Week Seven It Must Be Tuesday

While most of the Bryley team works from the Clinton office, I’m physically distanced, writing at home. And as the days have grown to months in this work-from-home-if-you-can-work-from-home world, our perspectives change as our settling-in has changed us. So here’s a bit of remote work advice, for the times they are still a-changin’.

And Then There Was Pajama Day

Another Friday in April, Bryley tried out Pajama Day. And it was again a lot of fun and informative!

Roy showed his true Patriot colors (Go Stidham!). Robin wore her awesome animal slippers (does she wear those to get the mail?). Michelle brought her well-loved blanket. Cathy was all about comfort — in her cotton flannels, and toting her coffee and a bit of chocolate therapy. The Legend of Zelda hooded robe donned by Lucas was fantastic (don’t recall if Link wore plaid pajamas? well he shoulda)! And Gavin was seen dragging around a green teddy bear (that an Okie thing?).

Bryley Team Looks Back in Costumes

To bring a little levity during the crisis of the virus, the Bryley Team — essential services, so most are together at the office in Clinton, MA with some remoting — decided to have a costume day on Friday, April 3rd. The theme was ‘How About We Think About Any Other Year Besides 2020?’ And the thing actually delivered more than a few smiles and giggles around here. Here are some costume highlights:

Mike R. Cleans Up Pretty Good

Members of the Bryley Systems team were working weekends to meet our commitments, reduce interpersonal contacts, and keeping our clients operational; but everyone at BRYLEY SYSTEMS made it possible!

The Office Move

An office move is a complicated process, with many moving parts and plenty of vendors operating on inter-dependent schedules.

Over a Friday night and Saturday morning, our dedicated team members setup the network equipment and end-user workstations at our clients’ new facility; their efforts allowed the clients’ employees to return to work, with little disruption.

The Workstation Upgrade

Similarly, the deployment of upgraded equipment depends on a coordinated team effort to prepare, configure, deliver, unbox, deploy, and setup the new equipment, while sanitizing touched surfaces, and then removing, transporting, and preparing the old equipment for recycling.

On a recent Saturday, our team’s mission was to replace over 15 workstations, basically deploying new Windows 10 workstations, while recycling the old equipment.

The team worked together through the morning and most of the afternoon – in a safe and socially-responsible manner (also in an extremely clean environment, as shown by the photo of our Senior Technician, Mike, in our clients’ clean room) – to get the job done. (This client is an essential manufacturer that delivers the world’s finest specialty surgical products.)

This was a true team effort at a difficult time that included everyone at Bryley Systems; our clients were extremely appreciative, and we are proud of what we accomplished!

 

 

Can Machine Learning Save Us from Us?

Among the top headlines in Google News’s Technology section today was criminal hackers use of AI (Artificial Intelligence) and its subset, ML (Machine Learning)1. Opening the article, I found a synopsis of a Tech Republic report, “Cybersecurity: Let’s Get Tactical,” in which the authors give ten ways cybercriminals are attacking with AI2 including

  • phishing attacks, in which, upon gaining credentialed access, automatic scripts can wreak havoc, including draining bank accounts
  • credential stuffing and brute force attacks, in which AI systems try passwords — and password possibilities — on many websites
  • bulletproof hosting services that use automation to hide the tracks of malicious websites, so they can’t be stopped by law-enforcement, or often flagged by network scanning tools

The fact is, it’s an arms race. Both malware and criminal sites would be pretty quickly and easily identified on a network by the nature of their activity. So the criminals try to disguise their malware in benign code and their sites in bulletproof hosting schemes. The way they keep the ruse going is through machine learning adapting to changing circumstances.

Meet Frank Walek

Frank Walek has been recently hired as an IT Support Technician to operate Bryley Systems’ dispatch center.

Mr. Walek graduated from the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester and has been working in customer service and support for the past ten years. He has worked for non-profit organizations and special education programs, developing a reputation for excellent customer service and always going above and beyond to help others. In 2019, Frank completed a Google certificate program for IT support professionals and is merging his passion of helping others with technical services at Bryley Systems.

 

 

Cybersecurity Risk Assessment Becoming a Must for Investors

In July the World Economic Forum (WEF) delivered a paper1 that argued for putting the muscle of investment into shifting the cybersecurity landscape. WEF/Marsh & McLennan reports2 that among weapons of mass destruction and natural disasters, cyberattacks are seventh in likelihood and eighth in impact as the greatest threats to global prosperity.

So Long, Old Friend

January 14, 2020. The day Win7 died. Really it’s the day Microsoft stopped issuing free security updates and support for the nearly 11-year-old OS. No more patches. No more tech support for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008/2008 R2.

And gathered among us are some who are denying the inevitable: migrating to Windows 10. A world without patches is no place to secure your business’s data. Windows desktop OS vulnerabilities have almost doubled the past six years. 1 And one-in-three breaches 2 caused globally is due to an unpatched vulnerability. A breach could mean curtains for your business: the average cost of a data breach in 2018 was $3.86 million (each lost or stolen record averaged out to $148). Consider the risks in remaining without security updates.