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Fitness regime for your IT equipment: Keep it clean, cool, and empowered

IT (Information Technology) equipment is somewhat temperamental; it requires reasonable temperatures; stable, uninterrupted power; and some air flow to operate efficiently.  Cleanliness is important.  Here’s how to keep it toned.

IT equipment should be kept in a clean, neat, and (preferably) dust-adverse/static-resistant area; walls with painted surfaces, tiled or coated floors without carpeting, etc.  Fire-suppression equipment is a plus, but cannot be water-based.

Access should be restricted; a separate, locked room is ideal, but a closet with sufficient space and air flow can work for smaller sites.

Dust is the enemy of fans and electrical components; a reduced-dust environment and regular cleaning of equipment fans can lengthen the life of most items.  (Note: cleanings should be performed when equipment is powered-down, which is not always desirable or feasible.)

The area should have dedicated electrical circuits with sufficient amperage to match the power requirements of the equipment.  We also recommend an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) for all critical items (and require them for equipment that we cover under our Comprehensive Support Program); the UPS provides emergency power when the input-power source is unavailable, but it also helps to regulate fluctuations in power, both spikes/surges (voltage overload) and brown-outs (reduction in voltage) that can damage sensitive equipment.

Cooling and humidity control are very important; most equipment runs optimally within a narrow range of temperature (64° to 81° Fahrenheit) and a maximum range of relative humidity of 60%.  HP, in an effort to be “greener”, lists current specifications on its DL360 server that provide a wider range of 50° to 90°F with 10% to 90% humidity (non-condensing).  However, cooler temperatures do make things last longer.  (The DL360 will actually throttle-back the CPU when the air-inlet sensors detect temperatures over 85°F.)

The area should have continuous air flow (to provide new, cool air while removing heated air that is exiting the equipment) and remain uncluttered to facilitate this air flow.  A dedicated A/C unit combined with a closed door is optimal; locating all equipment within a rack enclosure (with blanking panels over open areas) can enhance air flow.

TechAdvisory has 9 tips at http://techtimes.techadvisory.org/2011/11/9-steps-you-must-know-to-prevent-a-server-crash/.